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A participant from LPS

A good library is an essential school facility. It encourages the love of books, reading and learning. It is even more important for schools where children can't afford their own.

Loyola Project School (LPS) uses the infrastructure of Loyola School and has on its rolls 700 under-privileged children from surrounding areas. It operates in the afternoon when the students of the main school have finished. LPS was started in 1992 by the Jesuits at Loyola. It now operates under the Jharkhand Education Project, a Government of Jharkhand initiative, which aims to improve education levels in the economically backward sections of society. It runs on a very tight budget. Each student pays a fee between Rs 10-30 which partially covers the expenses of the 18 faculty members, which is part complimented by the government. A typical LPS student's parent is a tailor, gardener, driver or mechanic. Many students themselves work part time to add to their family income.

Blood test before operation

Tepasai village is about 165 kms from Jamshedpur, beyond Chaibasa. The closest hospital is more than 25 kms away. The tribals of Tepasai have no local access to doctors or modern medicine. The Loyola Alumni Association holds 2 medical camps a year at Tepasai, treating on an average a 1000 patients on each occasion. A common ailment among the rural male is hydrocele and hernia, something that we cannot take care of during the one day camps for the want of adequate facilities on location.

Bachendri Pal

Last Sunday, December 9, 2007, we held a medical camp at Tumung, 26 kms from here on the Hata road, a location where Ms Bachendri Pal, the first Indian lady on Everest, holds her local rock climbing camp. A beautiful location next to a village is spotted with large rocks and a lake. An excellent location for a picnic. Those interested in rock climbing will have to sign up in advance with Tata Steel Adventure Foundation (TSAF).

Atanu Chakraborty

Atanu Chakraborty, Loyolean 1989 ISC batch, a Chartered Accountant by profession and currently residing in Oman has made his foray into the art of writing by publishing his first book titled "Sunset over Bulawayo", a political fiction highlighting the present Zimbabwe political scenario. The book is available on Amazon, the online book store.

 

35 years later!

It all started with an almost nonchalant throw away line from R N Dutta: "Let's meet on 30 and 31 December," he said in one of his emails. This line became the idea whose time had come. The enthusiasm was spontaneous and infectious and support grew. Emails flew between computers and these computers were strung across continents: Asia, America, Europe, Africa, Australia. The 1971 batch was on the move and determined not to stop until it had reached its destination in Jamshedpur.