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Reminisces

Eugene PowerI was associated with Loyola School for forty-one years and it seems like only yesterday that I arrived there in 1954 on the Bombay Mail at about 2.00 o’clock in the morning, while the Jesuit Fathers were still in the arms of morpheus. Fr. Dincher picked me up at the Tatanagar Railway Station. The date was Feb. 22, George Washington's birthday. I had embarked on the S.S. United States from New York on Feb. 12, the birthday of Abraham Lincoln. Therefore, both days were blessed by the two greatest presidents of the United States.

I was welcomed by the bright city lights of Jamshedpur and the brand new, spick and span, dazzlingly bright Loyola building. It had just opened for classes in January 1954, but some work was still going on in cleaning up the building and putting the final water-proofing surface on the terrace.

George HessA tiny back room, entered through a back door, was where I first met Fr. James McGinley, S.J., Principal of Loyola School, in October 1952. His chair, a modest desk and two chairs, ranked in front of the desk, filled the room.

Within a few weeks I learned that Fr. McGinley was to leave for Rome to prepare to teach young Jesuits Sociology in Pune (then Poona) and I was destined to take his place behind the desk. Any qualms which I felt were quickly dispelled by the wise counsel of Fr. Carroll Fasy, S.J., Superior of the Jamshedpur Jesuits, and the ever present support of Mr. Narasimha Rao.

Frank McGauleyDear Friends of Loyola,

Congratulations on the Golden Jubilee of Loyola!

Congratulations to the teachers, the parents, the benefactors, the Tata Company and my fellow Jesuits who have made it all possible!

My first experience at Loyola was my period of Regency, 1950-52. Fr. Carrol I. Fasy, S.J., our “Father Superior” and Rector, set the tone for those days. We loved to watch him stand on the stage of the old clubhouse which was our school and with dramatic flair address the Assembly: “The Loyola boy is known, not so much for his uniform of cloth, but for his uniform of behaviour”.

Originally published in the Motif of September 11, 2006.

(Fr. Hess is an eminent educationist who has spent more than half a century setting up schools, colleges and centres for vocational training in Jharkhand, Bihar and Orissa.)

The teaching staff of Loyola School was small when I entered its portals as Principal in 1953. 285 students were enrolled. Classes ranged from Std. I to Std. Xl. Among the teachers facing me at the assembly was the smiling face of a young man, Reynold D’Souza. His smile was noteworthy because of its omnipresence and because it carried a genuine interest in those whom he taught.

Eugene PowerLooking back over Loyola’s first 50 years, we would like to give some kind of a short summary of what happened here in those years. To begin with, Loyola is rather proud of its humble beginnings. It was begun in January 1947, by two Calcutta Jesuits, Fr. Cecil Leeming and Fr. Robert Drugman. The School premises were the Chhotanagpur Regiment Club, situated on the property now belonging to Loyola School. This was adjacent to two football fields which became attached to Loyola.

Looking back over Loyola’s first 50 years, we would like to give some kind of a short summary of what happened here in those years. To begin with, Loyola is rather proud of its humble beginnings. It was begun in January 1947, by two Calcutta Jesuits, Fr. Cecil Leeming and Fr. Robert Drugman. The School premises were the Chhotanagpur Regiment Club, situated on the property now belonging to Loyola School. This was adjacent to two football fields which became attached to Loyola.

Father Eugene Power taught English language and literature at Loyola School , Jamshedpur , for several decades. Generations of students benefited from his erudition, his sense of duty to those committed to his charge, and the imagination he effortlessly employed to make his classes a treat not to be missed for anything. The Brothers Chatterjee – Goutam, Bhaskar and yours truly – felt/feel privileged to have been taught by this towering figure.

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All articles from the Golden Jubilee Souvenir published in 1997.